Make Lemonade

artjournalpocketbook2

Karen’s Folded Art Journal

The other morning I was excited to see a long anticipated email from the organizer of a local art retreat where I have wanted to teach for a long time. I spent days working on the colorful mixed media project and finally got organized enough to send in the proposal long before the deadline. I thought my design was unique and clever enough for the venue and was confident my work would be accepted. I felt this retreat was a perfect fit and I know many of the artists and designers who currently teach there.

I opened the email and started to read it’s contents with confidence. Elation quickly descended into despair when I realized it was a form rejection letter! I was saddened and a little perturbed. Don’t they know who I am? I questioned my ability to create anything interesting and felt like I should quit teaching altogether. Maybe I should take up knitting.Β  After a few minutes of thinking in all directions, my creative confidence quickly shriveled into a ball of insignificant beige fuzz on the floor.

My pity party lasted for a few hours and then I planned a way to turn the rejection into something positive. I thought of a few nationally known teaching venues and sent out an email inquiry to my first choice, a prestigious art event in New Mexico.

I decided to send out the rejected project but wanted to make some improvements to the original. I don’t know why my project was rejected in the first place and I will never know the factors behind the decision making process but I wanted to look at ways the project could be more appealing. Once the revisions were made I sent the proposal to the new venue and it was quickly and enthusiastically accepted. My confidence as a creative individual had been restored!

We are not supposed to take rejection personally, but I can’t help it if I do. I have learned that after the first crush of disappointment passes it is important to evaluate how to make something better and look at the rejection as a jumping off point for improvement and not a failure.

When life hands you lemons, make lemonade!

About Karen Elaine

Artist, author and teacher.
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4 Responses to Make Lemonade

  1. Connie Ullery says:

    Hi Karen: Am quite impressed with your journal and so happy you made some lemonade. Funny how things end up. I know you will be a huge success in N. Mexico. See you Wednesday!!! Connie

    > WordPress.com > Karen Elaine posted: ” The other morning I was excited to see a long > anticipated email from the organizer of a local art retreat where I > have wanted to teach for a long time. I spent days working on the > colorful mixed media project and finally got organized enough to send i” >

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  2. Karen Elaine says:

    Thank you Connie! I look forward to seeing you too.

    Like

  3. ann krier says:

    Rejection is just ONE person or teams opinion. Meaningless really. This is a fabulous project idea and I am sure it will serve you well – somewhere. I hate it for you but know that in the long run – its just a twist in the path that will take you to another place. You get big points for continuing to try πŸ™‚

    Like

  4. Cindi says:

    I remember the first and only time I experienced rejection as it pertained to my art. I haven’t quite recovered from it and in the art world I’m not a somebody at all. Rejection hurts. Glad you turned it around πŸ™‚

    Like

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